Dog Leash Training the Easy and Gentle Way of Dog Leash Training

March 12th, 2010 by | Print

Dog leash training can be a challenge, especially if you have a dog that is dominant and determined. Dogs with these characteristics seem to disregard any form of restraint and will pull incessantly. This can be dangerous for the owner who can get pulled to the ground, especially with larger dogs, or suffer shoulder injury from the constant strain.

Dogs tend to focus only on where they are going and what they’ll find when they get there. They disregard anything else. They don’t care what’s behind them, namely, their owners trying to hold them back.

People have tried choke chains and other devices that are supposed to deter the dog from pulling, but they can harm your dog’s throat and neck and in some cases, cause permanent injury.

Dog leash training does not have to be painful. Here are two methods you can try that have worked successfully for other dog owners.

Long Leash - Short Leash

In this method, you will have two leashes: a regular length and a 20-30 foot one. You can purchase nylon cord for the longer leash as this is extremely strong and durable. Carry some small treats that you can use to reward your dog every time he performs correctly.

First, put your dog on the regular leash to keep him close to you while you make your area desirable by dropping the occasional treat on the ground or hand-feed your dog a few pieces. When your dog has learned to associate being near you with those tasty morsels, it’s time to switch to the long cord.

Be sure you are in a safe area for this in case your dog gets away from you. You will not be holding the cord. Drop it on the ground as you and your dog walk. As soon as your dog begins to get ahead of you, command him to “wait” and if he keeps going, step on the leash.

Call your dog to you and reward him with a treat when he obeys. If it appears that your dog will not come to you, add some incentive by walking away from your dog while calling his name. Repeat this exercise every time your dog pulls ahead of you, always changing direction. This forces your dog to pay attention since dogs usually do not like to be separated from their pack.

It will take awhile for your dog to learn to walk beside you and not pull on the leash. Just be persistent and consistent in your methods and eventually he will break the habit of pulling ahead.

When the lesson has been learned, switch back to the regular leash which you should be able to hold loosely, since your dog no longer sees it as a way to force you to follow him. He will learn that you are the pack leader, not him.

The Unpredictable

The key is to get your dog to focus on you, not on what’s ahead. The best way to do that is to be unpredictable during dog leash training.

Keep a few treats in your pocket and the leash quite loose as you begin your walk. As soon as your dog pulls ahead, turn in a different direction. When your dog catches up, reward him with one of the treats. Each time he pulls, repeat the direction change only do not just turn back the way you came. Smart dogs will soon catch on to this trick and it will become ineffective.

Repeat as often and as long as necessary until your dog passes his dog leash training.

Francis N. Tressler
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/dog-leash-training-the-easy-and-gentle-way-of-dog-leash-training-695361.html

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7 Responses »

  1. Might be Interested in getting a Great Dane…..what can you tell me about them? (other questions inside)?
    Okay so we were talking to a lady yesterday that has owned and loves Great Danes and she was telling us how docile they are. How good they are with kids, and how they are protective over the children….

    Anyways what can you tell me about great danes (from Personal experience)

    About how big do they get?

    They look like they’d be a little strong (saw one pulling our neighbor down the road) Are they easy to leash train?

    Are they easy to train?

    I was told they make a good watch dog (not guard dog) and will alert you to danger, is this true?

    Is it true they are one of the most gentle dogs?

    What health issues does the breed have as a whole?

    Also what is the best living environment for them (house, apartment?)

    Thanks just doing a little research on the breed out of curiousity.

  2. They are gentle and can be very sweet - maybe even a tad skittish at times. I worked at a vet hospital, and one of the vets brought her two great danes every day.

    They can get quite tall, and some like to jump up on you.

    Hers were well-behaved, but she a no-bark collar (gives a small shock to the dog when it barks).
    References :

  3. Great danes do well in most environments, except living out side. They are fairly low energy dogs and don’t actually need a large house to live in as long as they get adequate exercise. They are very tall (femelase should be at least 28 inches at the shoulder, the males 32 inches at the shoulder- and that is considered to be short). They make excellent family dogs and guard dogs. Most dogs will alert you to danger, it is a trait of the species and is not limited to specific breeds. they are very gentle but still must be supervised at all times with small children (as all dogs should be). they are easy to train, but MUST be trained consistently because they are so large that obedience is a must. They have lots of health issues as do many of the giant breeds- heart problems, hip displaysia, wobbles, and a shorter life span (8-9 years on average) are just some. Check the akc parent club for more information. http://www.gdca.org/
    References :

  4. Anyways what can you tell me about great danes (from Personal experience)

    My Grandparents had Great Danes when i was growing up, i remember them being like horses to me. and one named jake looked like a huge black lab and let me lay on him and cuddle when i was small(unfortunately he got bone cancer and eventually had to be put down)

    About how big do they get?
    the world’s "tallest dog" (standing like a human) is a great dane! they can be enoromus!

    They look like they’d be a little strong (saw one pulling our neighbor down the road) Are they easy to leash train?
    any dog is easy to train, it just takes alot of effort and you can’t slack!
    Are they easy to train?

    I was told they make a good watch dog (not guard dog) and will alert you to danger, is this true?
    most dogs can be great guard dogs and i remember the ones we had were alert to what was going on

    Is it true they are one of the most gentle dogs?
    they were very gentle with me when i was 8 and younger(that’s when the last one past)

    What health issues does the breed have as a whole?
    they can get tumors and hip dysplesia and don’t have a super long lifespan

    Also what is the best living environment for them (house, apartment?)
    definatly a house! they are big and need room to run around

    Good luck!
    References :
    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/greatdane.htm

  5. My dad had Danes when I was a kid.
    None of his were terribly bright.
    One of them has joing problems in his shoulder. Apparently joint problems are a weakness in some bloodlines.
    Gentle, yes, for the most part.
    When I was obedience training a beagle (yeah, I know, what was I thinking) the instructors said that Danes can be difficult to train. Again, not very bright.
    References :

  6. males can get up to 200 lbs and females up to 130 ish

    they’re very strong. as for being easy to train? well, they’re very smart dogs, but you have to be a firm pack leader. alerting you to danger? lol like what? an earthquake? a tornado? a stalker? they’ll bark when people walk by…as for anything else, that’s really an individual thing.

    yes, they are very gentle and very sweet dogs. they are big so a house with a yard is good. but they aren’t very active indoors. they definitely need a good long walk daily or a good play session.

    as for health issues, most big dogs have hip dysplasia

    be aware though, big dogs don’t have long life spans and Great Danes are no exception!
    References :

  7. Great Danes are excellent dogs, just make sure if you get one you train it well. They’re too big to let run wild. I myself got a great dane puppy a couple weeks ago and so far, he’s smart and is doing good with potty training, but does not like to be in his crate. I have a toddler and the puppy seems to be good with him, but of course he is a puppy still so he is hyper!
    References :
    dog owner

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